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Cut Nails for BOAT BUILDING

Boat builders in the UK, Eire, Europe, Scandinavia, S. E. Asia, Australasia and South America insist on using cut boat nails (or ship nails as they are sometimes known).

Why?

    Each market has its own preferred shape of nail that usually reflects their traditional method of building the boat.

Rosehead Square Shank Spike -   S. E. Asia, South America, UK & Eire
Rosehead Flat Point Nail -   UK, Eire & Europe
Boat Nail (Round head) -   Scandinavia


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ROSEHEAD SQUARE SHANK SPIKE
          View picture     View drawing

Shape
(short taper)

Sizes (mm)

No. per kilo (approx)

SQURSHNK2.gif (4123 bytes)

  50 x 4 144
  65 x 4 113
  65 x 5 80
  75 x 5 68
  75 x 6 38
  90 x 5 56
  90 x 6 32
100 x 6 29
100 x 8 18
115 x 8 16
125 x 6 23
125 x 8 14
150 x 8 12
  150 x 10 8
175 x 8 10
  175 x 10 7
200 x 8 8
  200 x 10 6

Used in S. E. Asia, South America, UK & Eire also used worldwide for restoration work

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ROSEHEAD FLAT POINT NAIL
                    View picture
     View drawing

Shape
(long taper)
Size (mm) No. per kilo
(approx)
FLTPOINT2.gif (4084 bytes) 40 x 3 280
50 x 5 112
65 x 5 98
75 x 6 48
90 x 6 38
100 x 6 34
115 x 8 20
125 x 8 18
150 x 10 10
175 x 10 9
200 x 10 6

Used in UK, Eire & Europe also worldwide for restoration work

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BOAT NAIL (Round Head)
                    View picture
     View drawing

Shape Size (mm) No. per kilo approx
boatnail.gif (4055 bytes) 50 x 5 x 4 140
65 x 5 x 4 122
75 x 6 x 5 55
100 x 8 x 6 34
125 x 10 x 8 20
150 x 10 x 8 14
175 x 10 x 8 12
200 x 10 x 8 10

Used in Scandinavia this nail has a similar shape to a Mustad (or Mustadfors) square wire nail called an Ekspik or Timmerspik

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Why use CUT BOAT NAILS?



    Cut boat nails are extremely robust, easy to drive and, when the wet swollen wood fibres expand, the nails will not work loose.

    The nails are manufactured from mild steel to BS EN 10 051:1992:HR3,4,14,15 and BS EN 10 025:1993:Fe430A . Add a HOT DIP GALVANIZED (to BS EN ISO 1461:1999) finish and you have one of the strongest and longest lasting nail fixings available.

Many boat builders like to clinch the nails.  This involves bending the nail point through 90 after the nail has penetrated the timber to help hold the nail tightly in place. When asked, we can ensure that the nails will clinch and not break. View picture  This method of fixing nails in boat building can be traced back to Roman times 2000 years ago. For evidence of clinching in AD 150 click here. (To see pictures of the clinched nails - view 'ENGLISH' then 'Navis Ships' then under 'Great Britain' click on the ship number by 'Blackfriars 1' and finally click on 'All images of this ship')

The above provides the real benefit of our BOAT NAILS which is that the boat - normally a fishing boat - can remain at sea longer earning income for the boat owner. Using an inferior type of nail causes more frequent maintenance stopping the owner's income flow.

The properties of these nails mean they are also used to build small wooden docks, jetties and piers. Each dock, jetty or pier made of wood requires a suitably protected strong nail that will withstand the movement of the wood as it expands and contracts over time.  In addition, these nails are often used to secure wooden lock gates particularly in the UK and help in the preservation of the canal system.


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